Why is the 10 20 30 rule helpful?

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By Nick

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Looking to create a powerful presentation? Look no further than the 10/20/30 rule of PowerPoint. Developed by venture capitalist Guy Kawasaki, this guideline consists of three key elements: 10 slides, 20 minutes, and a 30-point font size. By limiting yourself to 10 slides, you’ll be forced to focus on the most salient points, making your presentation more engaging and easier to follow. And with a 30-point font size, your message will be clear and concise. This rule is a must-have tool for marketers looking to create effective presentations.

The 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint: A Powerful Tool for Marketers

As a marketer, you know the importance of creating powerful presentations to persuade your audience. However, it can be challenging to know where to start and how to make your presentation stand out. That’s where the 10/20/30 rule of PowerPoint comes in. This rule, developed by venture capitalist Guy Kawasaki, is a simple yet effective way to create presentations that captivate your audience and get your message across.

What is the 10/20/30 Rule of PowerPoint?

The 10/20/30 rule of PowerPoint is a guideline for creating presentations that consists of three elements: 10 slides, 20 minutes, and a 30-point font size. According to Kawasaki, limiting yourself to 10 slides forces you to focus on the most important points and avoid overwhelming your audience with too much information. The 20-minute time limit ensures that your presentation is concise and to the point, while the 30-point font size ensures that your text is readable and easy to understand.

Why is the 10/20/30 Rule Helpful?

The 10/20/30 rule is helpful for several reasons. First, it forces you to be concise and to the point. By limiting yourself to 10 slides and 20 minutes, you have to focus on the most important information and leave out anything that is not essential. This makes your presentation more engaging and easier to follow.

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Second, the 30-point font size ensures that your text is readable and easy to understand. This is especially important if you are presenting to a large audience or if you have a lot of text on your slides. By using a larger font size, you can make sure that everyone in the room can read your slides and follow along with your presentation.

Finally, the 10/20/30 rule is helpful because it allows you to focus on the most important points of your presentation. By limiting yourself to 10 slides, you have to choose the most salient points to present to your audience. This forces you to think critically about your message and how to best convey it to your audience.

How to Use the 10/20/30 Rule

Using the 10/20/30 rule is simple. Start by creating an outline of your presentation and identifying the most important points you want to convey. Then, choose the 10 most important points and create a slide for each one. Make sure to use a large font size and limit the amount of text on each slide.

When presenting, aim to keep your presentation to 20 minutes or less. This will ensure that your audience stays engaged and focused throughout your presentation. Remember to use visuals and other multimedia elements to break up the text and make your presentation more engaging.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the 10/20/30 rule of PowerPoint is a powerful tool for marketers looking to create engaging and effective presentations. By limiting yourself to 10 slides, 20 minutes, and a 30-point font size, you can focus on the most important points of your presentation and ensure that your message is clear and concise. Whether you’re presenting to a large audience or a small group, the 10/20/30 rule is a simple yet effective way to make your presentation stand out and get your message across.

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References for « Why is the 10 20 30 rule helpful? »

  1. Kawasaki, G. (2005). The 10/20/30 rule of PowerPoint. Guy Kawasaki.
  2. Mui, C. (2011). The 10/20/30 rule of PowerPoint. Forbes.
  3. Reynolds, G. (2005). The 10/20/30 rule of PowerPoint. Presentation Zen.
  4. Rosamund Stone Zander & Benjamin Zander. (2002). The Art of Possibility: Transforming Professional and Personal Life. Penguin Books.
  5. Reynolds, G. (2011). Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery. New Riders.

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