How many lives did Dr Jenner save?

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By Nick

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Edward Jenner, a medical pioneer in the late 18th century, is responsible for eradicating smallpox, a disease that killed around 50 million people each year. Jenner noticed that milkmaids who had contracted cowpox, a less severe disease, did not get smallpox. He conducted his first experiment in 1796, injecting pus from a cowpox lesion into an eight-year-old boy, who did not contract smallpox when exposed to the disease later. His discovery of the smallpox vaccine was a turning point in medical history and paved the way for the development of vaccines for diseases such as polio, measles, and influenza. Jenner’s contribution to medicine should be celebrated and remembered.

Edward Jenner: A Heroic Figure in Medical History

It’s a shame that not many people know the name Edward Jenner. This man was a true hero in the medical world, responsible for eradicating a disease that was killing millions of people in the late 18th century. Smallpox was a deadly disease that had a mortality rate of between 10 and 30 percent, and it was killing around 50 million people each year. But thanks to Jenner’s work, smallpox is now a thing of the past.

The Life of Edward Jenner

Edward Jenner was born in 1749 in Berkeley, Gloucestershire, England. He was the eighth of nine children, and his father was a vicar. Jenner was educated at a local school and then went on to study medicine in London. After completing his studies, he returned to his hometown and began practicing medicine.

It was during his time as a country doctor that Jenner became interested in smallpox. He noticed that milkmaids who had contracted cowpox, a less severe disease, did not get smallpox. This observation led him to believe that cowpox could be used as a vaccine against smallpox.

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The Discovery of the Smallpox Vaccine

Jenner conducted his first experiment in 1796. He took pus from a cowpox lesion on a milkmaid’s hand and injected it into an eight-year-old boy. The boy developed a mild case of cowpox but did not contract smallpox when exposed to the disease later. Jenner repeated this experiment with several other subjects, including his own son, and found that the vaccine was effective in preventing smallpox.

News of Jenner’s discovery quickly spread, and he became famous throughout Europe. In 1801, the British government granted him £10,000 to continue his research, and he published a book about his findings called « An Inquiry into the Causes and Effects of the Variolae Vaccinae. »

The Legacy of Edward Jenner

Jenner’s discovery of the smallpox vaccine was a turning point in medical history. Smallpox was one of the deadliest diseases in human history, killing an estimated 300 million people in the 20th century alone. But thanks to Jenner’s work, smallpox was eradicated from the world in 1980.

Jenner’s legacy lives on today, not just in the eradication of smallpox but in the development of other vaccines. His work paved the way for the development of vaccines for diseases such as polio, measles, and influenza, which have saved countless lives.

In Conclusion

Edward Jenner should be more of a household name. His discovery of the smallpox vaccine was a monumental achievement that saved millions of lives. We owe a debt of gratitude to Jenner and to all the scientists who have followed in his footsteps, working tirelessly to develop vaccines that protect us from deadly diseases.

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